phototoartguy:

San Joaquin kit foxes can be difficult to spot because their colors blend in so well with their habitat. They are one of the most endangered mammals in the state.
Chuck Graham
The Carrizo Plain National Monument, Calif.

phototoartguy:

San Joaquin kit foxes can be difficult to spot because their colors blend in so well with their habitat. They are one of the most endangered mammals in the state.

Chuck Graham

The Carrizo Plain National Monument, Calif.

lemurphant:

Side-striped jackals, found in Central and Southern Africa, are monogamous and mate for life. Pairs live together with their pups and defend their territories against outsiders.
Photo by Thierry Marysael

lemurphant:

Side-striped jackals, found in Central and Southern Africa, are monogamous and mate for life. Pairs live together with their pups and defend their territories against outsiders.

Photo by Thierry Marysael

(via canis-decassatus)

Czech Republic: Wolves return after a century absence
A hidden camera has captured an image of a wolf crossing a wooded clearing in the Czech Republic, a hundred years after the predator disappeared from the area, it’s been reported.
There have been some signs near the town of Doksy suggesting a wolf may be in the region, Radio Prague reports. But wolves haven’t roamed free in Bohemia since the late 19th Century.
Right now, there is probably just one wolf or maybe a pair, says environmental expert Miroslav Kutal. The animal is likely to have strayed into Bohemia from the border regions of Germany and Poland, where the wolf population has been thriving.
But Kutal tells Radio Impuls the conditions in Bohemia - especially in former military zones and in the mountainous border regions - seem to be good for breeding. This is something to be encouraged, he adds, since wolves can regulate the deer population and draw tourists to the area. But the arrival of poachers could become a concern.
(via BBC News)

Czech Republic: Wolves return after a century absence

A hidden camera has captured an image of a wolf crossing a wooded clearing in the Czech Republic, a hundred years after the predator disappeared from the area, it’s been reported.

There have been some signs near the town of Doksy suggesting a wolf may be in the region, Radio Prague reports. But wolves haven’t roamed free in Bohemia since the late 19th Century.

Right now, there is probably just one wolf or maybe a pair, says environmental expert Miroslav Kutal. The animal is likely to have strayed into Bohemia from the border regions of Germany and Poland, where the wolf population has been thriving.

But Kutal tells Radio Impuls the conditions in Bohemia - especially in former military zones and in the mountainous border regions - seem to be good for breeding. This is something to be encouraged, he adds, since wolves can regulate the deer population and draw tourists to the area. But the arrival of poachers could become a concern.

(via BBC News)

Rare sight: Jackal spotted at mangroves in Mumbai 
by Ranjeet Jadhav
It was a rare sight when a wildlife lover spotted a jackal in a mangrove belt off the Eastern Express Highway recently. With the rapid destruction of mangroves, the animal being spotted is a rare sight.
The jackal was spotted by 21-year-old Adwait Jadhav, a wildlife volunteer with Resquink Association for Wildlife Welfare (RAWW), when he had gone birdwatching in the mangrove belt near the Bhandup pumping station off the Eastern Express Highway.
Pawan Sharma from RAWW said, “The animal was spotted more than two weeks back, when Adwait had gone birdwatching early in the morning. He was lucky two years ago, too, when he captured two jackals on lens in the same belt.”
The sight gave hope to environmentalists and wildlife experts, since animals were still inhabiting the otherwise rapidly declining mangrove cover. Jackal sightings were common in the nineties in the mangrove belts of Dahisar, Lokhandwala, Ghodbunder, Malvani, Malad too.
But, the rapid destruction of mangroves, along with illegal dumping of construction debris, say wildlife experts, has led to the decline in spotting them. Experts demanded proper conservation schemes to help preserve the animals and their natural habitat around the city.
Sharma added, “If we want to save this beautiful animal, the government should come up with a proper programme for the conservation of jackals. The Mangroves Cell should get involved with likeminded individuals and organisations, and spread awareness and act necessary towards conserving mangroves.”
Read more

Rare sight: Jackal spotted at mangroves in Mumbai 

by Ranjeet Jadhav

It was a rare sight when a wildlife lover spotted a jackal in a mangrove belt off the Eastern Express Highway recently. With the rapid destruction of mangroves, the animal being spotted is a rare sight.

The jackal was spotted by 21-year-old Adwait Jadhav, a wildlife volunteer with Resquink Association for Wildlife Welfare (RAWW), when he had gone birdwatching in the mangrove belt near the Bhandup pumping station off the Eastern Express Highway.

Pawan Sharma from RAWW said, “The animal was spotted more than two weeks back, when Adwait had gone birdwatching early in the morning. He was lucky two years ago, too, when he captured two jackals on lens in the same belt.”

The sight gave hope to environmentalists and wildlife experts, since animals were still inhabiting the otherwise rapidly declining mangrove cover. Jackal sightings were common in the nineties in the mangrove belts of Dahisar, Lokhandwala, Ghodbunder, Malvani, Malad too.

But, the rapid destruction of mangroves, along with illegal dumping of construction debris, say wildlife experts, has led to the decline in spotting them. Experts demanded proper conservation schemes to help preserve the animals and their natural habitat around the city.

Sharma added, “If we want to save this beautiful animal, the government should come up with a proper programme for the conservation of jackals. The Mangroves Cell should get involved with likeminded individuals and organisations, and spread awareness and act necessary towards conserving mangroves.”

Read more

A Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) photographed in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Wolves are one of many species now thriving in the area. 
Photo by Guillaume Herbaut

A Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) photographed in the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Wolves are one of many species now thriving in the area. 

Photo by Guillaume Herbaut

This Asiatic Jackal, Canis aureus, was photographed in Thailand, as part of a research project utilizing motion-activated camera-traps. You are invited to go WILD on Smithsonian’s interactive website, Smithsonian WILD, to learn more about the research and browse photos like this from around the world.

This Asiatic Jackal, Canis aureus, was photographed in Thailand, as part of a research project utilizing motion-activated camera-traps.

You are invited to go WILD on Smithsonian’s interactive website, Smithsonian WILD, to learn more about the research and browse photos like this from around the world.

(Source: Flickr / smithsonianwild)

Rare Alaska wolf may get Endangered Species Act protection 
by Louis Sahagun
Federal authorities announced Friday that the geographically isolated Alexander Archipelago wolf of southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest may need protection under the Endangered Species Act to survive the impact of logging, hunting and trapping in its old-growth habitat.
Populations of the rare subspecies of gray wolf are in steep decline in portions of the heavily logged region, where they den in the root systems of western hemlock and Sitka spruce and hunt black-tailed deer, which also rely on the ancient trees to shield them from harsh winters.
The wolf, which scientists know as Canis lupus ligoni, relies on the deer for 90% of its diet during the winter months.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to determine within a year whether protecting the wolf as endangered or threatened is warranted.
The decision comes in response to a petition filed in 2011 byGreenpeace and the Center for Biological Diversity, which states that continued logging in the Tongass is destroying habitat and bringing new roads into the area, making the wolves — and their prey — increasingly vulnerable.
“The Alexander Archipelago wolf, one of Alaska’s most fascinating species, needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act if it’s to have any chance of survival,” Rebecca Noblin, Alaska director of the center, said in a prepared statement.
Read more
Photo by Robin Silver

Rare Alaska wolf may get Endangered Species Act protection

by Louis Sahagun

Federal authorities announced Friday that the geographically isolated Alexander Archipelago wolf of southeast Alaska’s Tongass National Forest may need protection under the Endangered Species Act to survive the impact of logging, hunting and trapping in its old-growth habitat.

Populations of the rare subspecies of gray wolf are in steep decline in portions of the heavily logged region, where they den in the root systems of western hemlock and Sitka spruce and hunt black-tailed deer, which also rely on the ancient trees to shield them from harsh winters.

The wolf, which scientists know as Canis lupus ligoni, relies on the deer for 90% of its diet during the winter months.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is expected to determine within a year whether protecting the wolf as endangered or threatened is warranted.

The decision comes in response to a petition filed in 2011 byGreenpeace and the Center for Biological Diversity, which states that continued logging in the Tongass is destroying habitat and bringing new roads into the area, making the wolves — and their prey — increasingly vulnerable.

“The Alexander Archipelago wolf, one of Alaska’s most fascinating species, needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act if it’s to have any chance of survival,” Rebecca Noblin, Alaska director of the center, said in a prepared statement.

Read more

Photo by Robin Silver

Police arrest 12 for illegal wolf hunting
Police in Hedmark county north of Oslo have arrested twelve men on suspicion of running an illegal wolf-hunting network. The men were arrested on Tuesday afternoon, after police mounted a coordinated raid, seizing hunting rifles, computers and tablet devices as potential evidence.
“The action is the result of an investigation through this winter,” Tarjei Istad, from Økokrim told Norway’s NRK channel. He said that the officers had seized “a great number of weapons”, some of which police suspected were unlicensed, as well as “computers, iPads and especially phones, which gives a lot of information in the current situation”.
Illegally killing wolves in Norway is usually punishable with a jail sentence.
Between 40 and 56 wolves were registered in Norway during the winter, putting the animal at risk of being wiped out in the country within just a few years. According to VG, illegal hunters have killed as many as 100 wolves over the last decade.
(via The Local)

Police arrest 12 for illegal wolf hunting

Police in Hedmark county north of Oslo have arrested twelve men on suspicion of running an illegal wolf-hunting network. The men were arrested on Tuesday afternoon, after police mounted a coordinated raid, seizing hunting rifles, computers and tablet devices as potential evidence.

“The action is the result of an investigation through this winter,” Tarjei Istad, from Økokrim told Norway’s NRK channel. He said that the officers had seized “a great number of weapons”, some of which police suspected were unlicensed, as well as “computers, iPads and especially phones, which gives a lot of information in the current situation”.

Illegally killing wolves in Norway is usually punishable with a jail sentence.

Between 40 and 56 wolves were registered in Norway during the winter, putting the animal at risk of being wiped out in the country within just a few years. According to VG, illegal hunters have killed as many as 100 wolves over the last decade.

(via The Local)

wolveswolves:

Wolf in The Netherlands officially becomes endangered species
What better gift could I recieve on this day to celebrate my 4th anniversary with David?! Now the only thing left to do is wait for their return!

The wolf will get a lawfully protected status. This will enable the Faunafund to grant compensations in damage caused by wolves if this will occur, writes Secretary of State Dijksma from the Ministry of Economic Affairs in a reaction to the advice from Alterra (Wageningen University) to the House of Representatives on the anticipation on the return of the wolf in The Netherlands. Wolves are inter alia coming from Germany, getting closer and closer to our borders. A possible return of the wolves after over 150 years to The Netherlands is not excluded.
The Faunafund and Dutch provinces are involved with the advice from Alterra. Provinces are significantly responsible for the implementation of the policy, also in relation to possible damage to cattle and compensations in this regard via the Faunafund.
A considerable part of the advice is on doing research. Particularly provinces will have to decide which research recommendations will be preformed short-term.
Within Europe, genetic reference material from wolves need to be shared more. This way, identifying wolves will become significantly easier. In The Netherlands, the joining of wolf knowledge will not take place via a wolf office, but will have to find a way via already existing organizations.
 Article sourcePicture by Gonnie van der Schans

wolveswolves:

Wolf in The Netherlands officially becomes endangered species

What better gift could I recieve on this day to celebrate my 4th anniversary with David?! Now the only thing left to do is wait for their return!

The wolf will get a lawfully protected status. This will enable the Faunafund to grant compensations in damage caused by wolves if this will occur, writes Secretary of State Dijksma from the Ministry of Economic Affairs in a reaction to the advice from Alterra (Wageningen University) to the House of Representatives on the anticipation on the return of the wolf in The Netherlands. Wolves are inter alia coming from Germany, getting closer and closer to our borders. A possible return of the wolves after over 150 years to The Netherlands is not excluded.

The Faunafund and Dutch provinces are involved with the advice from Alterra. Provinces are significantly responsible for the implementation of the policy, also in relation to possible damage to cattle and compensations in this regard via the Faunafund.

A considerable part of the advice is on doing research. Particularly provinces will have to decide which research recommendations will be preformed short-term.

Within Europe, genetic reference material from wolves need to be shared more. This way, identifying wolves will become significantly easier. In The Netherlands, the joining of wolf knowledge will not take place via a wolf office, but will have to find a way via already existing organizations.

Article source
Picture by Gonnie van der Schans

wolveswolves:

Young wolves eating berries

If you’re sad, watch this.